Ganoderma Lucidum, the Newest Drug from the World

In the summer of 2014, Dr. Michael M. Tullo, an associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, published a study in the journal Lancet that looked at Ganodermal Lucidus, a compound he was developing at the time to treat an ailment he diagnosed as “glaucoma” in his wife.

This condition, he said, “is a rare and complex condition in which the body cannot tolerate certain medications.”

He had treated it with a compound derived from a bacterium, called B. burgdorferi, that is also found in many other bacteria and parasites, including E. coli.

His compound worked, but it did not alleviate the symptoms.

This was not surprising, given the bacterium’s presence in the human body.

But Tullos discovery had a profound impact on his work and ultimately led to his discovery of a second compound that works with a bacteriostatic molecule, called a proton channel, that can convert the proton to a prokinetic one.

In a nutshell, the new compound, called Ganodermic acid, was able to act as an enzyme that converts the prokinetics into the normal proton, leading to the release of a normal amount of oxygen.

But the chemical was not just a good idea in terms of its efficacy; it was also a valuable new molecule.

Turno was already a pioneer of a new class of drugs based on bacterial growth-promoting compounds.

He had created the anti-inflammatory drug piperacillin and the antibiotic diclofenac.

The combination of the two drugs, along with a synthetic growth-inducing compound called kanamycin, were used in the first generation of anti-cancer drugs, including finasteride, which is used to prevent the growth of breast and colon cancer.

“I was trying to do what we can with these two drugs,” Tulloes research director at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said in a recent interview.

But his research into the bacteriosteroid compound that Tulloz could produce had a very specific goal: It was to combat the common bacteria-associated diseases that were causing so much pain and discomfort.

The first drug to be developed to treat these conditions was an anti-seizure drug called ketamine.

But it was ineffective.

It had a mild stimulant effect and did not work well at the very high doses used in its early studies.

Tullahos research team wanted a different drug to help the body heal itself from the stress of these common bacterial infections.

And so they turned to Ganodermita Lucidunum.

The compound that Dr. Tullyoz and his team had discovered could actually work.

Ganodermica Lucidin was not the first anti-inflammatories drug to get its start as a drug to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections, but Dr. David R. Minton, a professor of chemistry and bioengineering at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID) and one of the scientists who was working on the drug at the Army’s San Diego campus, was already working on a compound that could treat some of the most common bacterial disorders, including the urinary tract infection.

In fact, in 2004, he and a colleague from the Army and the University at Buffalo developed a similar compound that also helped treat bacterial infections and urinary tract infections.

In 2009, they began using the compound in clinical trials.

By the time it was approved in 2012, Ganodermatolucin, as the drug was named, had been found to be effective in treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other chronic diseases.

And it had also been shown to help treat a number of conditions that had been associated with the bacteria: heart failure, diabetes, obesity, cancer, and depression.

But when it came to the chronic respiratory disease (CRD), which was the cause of so many of these conditions, it was not yet clear whether or not it would also be effective at fighting the bacteria that cause it.

One of the major challenges was that, despite the fact that the CRD bacteria are also found naturally in the body, they are very sensitive to antibiotics.

They have a natural ability to respond to certain antibiotics, which means that if one antibiotic is not given enough, the bacteria will respond to another, which makes it more difficult to control.

Dr. Mankner and his colleagues at the USAMRIid were working to develop a compound called Ror-Ror that could be given to humans and mice, which would be a more effective treatment for the CRDs bacteria than the existing drugs.

Ror Ror was first shown to be very effective in the treatment of pneumonia and strep throat, and the compound could be