Cured Gansoderma lucidum leaves have improved oral bioavailability and have potential as a novel oral bioactive drug

A rare fungus that causes severe headaches, nausea and a loss of appetite is being used to improve oral bioaccessibility, a potential indication for its use as a drug.

Gansodermas lucidums leaves have long been touted as a potential bioactive to treat migraines, but a study by a team of researchers from The University of Western Australia, the University of Auckland and the University Health and Science Centre in Melbourne has now shown they can be used as a topical solution.

Dr. David Cairns, the lead researcher for the study, said the discovery of a fungal disease called gansodermosis lucidum was a big step forward for the development of an oral bioactives.

“This disease has been around for quite some time but only recently has the fungus evolved into a major disease,” he said.

“The discovery that we’ve been able to find some new species and use them as a fungens oral bio-actives is a huge step forward.”

Gansodermosis lucidums leaves are dried and then dried and dried and ground into a powder.

They are used as an edible, and also as a skin cream and as a supplement to prevent infections.

The new fungus, which is a new species in the genus Ganoderma, has been isolated from the wild.

“Gansdrumma lucidums is a fungus that has been very difficult to study,” Dr. Cairn said.

“We’ve been looking at other fungus types that are similar to it, but none of them have been successful.”

We’ve now isolated a new fungus that can be grown in the laboratory and grown on leaves and leaves and the spores have been very promising.

“It’s very promising because of the potential for oral bioactivity and the fact that we can make this product into a food product that is readily available for human consumption.”

He said it was important to understand the fungus, because it could potentially affect other strains of the fungus.

“There are other fungus that have been identified and are being tested and it’s been very interesting to watch them evolve and try and see if there are any side effects,” he explained.

The research was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.